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The SimoTime Library provides a collection of white papers, references to printed materials, sample programs, links to other Web sites and a download capability.

     
 References 
Mainframe
Mainframe & the Internet
Mainframe Material
CICS
IMS
DB/2
Assembler Connection
COBOL Connection
JCL Connection
SQL Connection
VSAM-QSAM Connection
Numeric Data Formats
Internet - Intranet
HTML
Color Chart
Miscellaneous
ASCII or EBCDIC
Issues and Possibilities

Downloads
Z-Packs
 
 Technologies 
  SIMOTEK2 Series
 
  SimoLYZE, Source Identifier
  SimoVIEW, Screen Convert
  SimoX390, Asm Analysis
  SimoZAPS, Overview
 
  ... Hex Access
  ... Modify
  ... Convert a File
  ... Compare Two Files
  SimoWEB1, Web Site on CD

 Internet Access 
  Search Engines
  General Information
  COBOL Language
  370 Assembler
  Mainframe Focus
  Internet Focus
  File Transfer Protocol
   
           
Reference Section
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This section will focus on topics of interest for the mainframe and the Internet world. Today, one of the biggest challenges facing developers and programmers is the integration of the number of systems running production applications that are critical to running the day-to-day business of a company.

Reference Section, Mainframe
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This section identifies a variety of references materials for IBM Mainframe System. This section primarily focuses on MVS or OS/390 systems. However, the items discussed in the CICS sub-sections would also apply to VSE systems.

Mainframe and the Internet
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Today, many companies are facing the competitive pressures of providing and gathering information via the Internet. The number of marketing oriented WEB sites has been increasing at a rapid pace and having a company "home page" is accepted as a normal process.

Now the business of doing business via the Internet has moved to the forefront. Quite often this will require access to data and the coordination with processes of existing systems and business applications. This will require a cooperative effort of Internet and Mainframe resources.

Companies want to include the mainframe as a major player functioning in its traditional role and taking on the new role of a very powerful server and large data base manager in an Internet environment. In today's world it is not a lack of technology and support but a question of what process, technology and support is required to meet a company's unique business requirements.

Companies are now seeking answers to the following questions.

1. How is the gap between the Internet world and the mainframe world minimized or eliminated?
2. Is it necessary to start from scratch or is it possible to modify and build on existing mainframe processes and technologies?
3. Are tools available to accelerate the process of building new information presentation components such as converting mainframe screens to HTML forms?
4. May the clients attach directly to the mainframe or will an intermediate application server be required?
5. Will the mainframe application require modification or is it practical to have the application server do the conversions required to connect a client directly to a mainframe terminal based program?

This article  Transforming a Mainframe Application for the Internet Environment  attempts to provide some answers and insight into the various issues and approaches of extending legacy systems to the Internet.

Mainframe Reference Material
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The following section is divided into three sub-sections for CICS, DB2 and lMS.

Mainframe References for CICS
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In 1984 and 1985 two books written by Doug Lowe were released. These two books have been used by CICS programmers as learning and reference material for years. A second edition was made available that covered all versions of CICS through version 3.3 and a programmer's desk reference was added. As of mid-2001 the "CICS for the COBOL Programmer, Part 1" and "Part 2" have been revised into a single book, now entitled "Murach's CICS for the COBOL Programmer" by Raul Menendez and Doug Lowe. The "CICS Programmer's Desk Reference" is still current and available.
 
Title - Author Publisher
Murach's CICS for the COBOL Programmer
Raul Menendez and Doug Lowe
ISBN: 1-890774-09-X
Mike Murach & Associates, Inc.
3484 W. Gettysburg, #101
Fresno, California 93722-7801
1-800-221-5528
http://www.murach.com
The CICS Programmer's Desk Reference
Second Edition,
Covers all versions of CICS through version 3.3
Doug Lowe
ISBN: 0-911625-68-2
Mike Murach & Associates, Inc.
3484 W. Gettysburg, #101
Fresno, California 93722-7801
1-800-221-5528
http://www.murach.com

Mainframe References for IMS
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The following two books are excellent learning and reference material for IMS.
 
Title - Author Publisher
IMS for the COBOL Programmer
Part 1: Data base processing with IMS/VS and DL/I
Database Programming

Steve Eckols
ISBN: 0-911625-29-1
Mike Murach & Associates, Inc.
3484 W. Gettysburg, #101
Fresno, California 93722-7801
1-800-221-5528
http://www.murach.com
IMS for the COBOL Programmer
Part 2: Data communications and Message Format Service

Steve Eckols
ISBN: 0-911625-30-5
Mike Murach & Associates, Inc.
3484 W. Gettysburg, #101
Fresno, California 93722-7801
1-800-221-5528
http://www.murach.com

Mainframe References for DB2
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The following book is an excellent learning and reference item for DB2.
 
Title - Author Publisher
DB2 for the COBOL Programmer
Second Edition, Covers Version 4.1

Curtis Garvin, Steve Eckols
ISBN: 1-890774-02-2
Mike Murach & Associates, Inc.
3484 W. Gettysburg, #101
Fresno, California 93722-7801
1-800-221-5528
http://www.murach.com
 
The Assembler Connection
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This link is intended for individuals that are learning, creating or maintaining applications that are written in mainframe assembler. Unless otherwise stated the examples provided in  The Assembler Connection  will run on an IBM Mainframe using MVS or a Personal Computer using Windows and Micro Focus Mainframe Express.

The Mainframe Assembler examples may be downloaded. The examples are available as Z-Packs that provide individual programming examples, documentation and test data files in a single package. The Z-Packs are usually in zip format to reduce the amount of time to download.

The COBOL Connection
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This link is intended for individuals that are learning, creating or maintaining applications that are written in COBOL. Unless otherwise stated the examples provided in  The COBOL Connection  will run on an IBM Mainframe using MVS or a Personal Computer using Windows and Micro Focus Mainframe Express.

The COBOL examples may be downloaded. The examples are available as Z-Packs that provide individual programming examples, documentation and test data files in a single package. The Z-Packs are usually in zip format to reduce the amount of time to download.

The JCL Connection
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This is a link to The JCL Connection that provides various examples of mainframe, MVS batch jobs. Each example provides the source code and supporting documentation. This link is intended for individuals that are learning, creating or maintaining mainframe MVS jobs.

The examples provided by this link are written to run as MVS batch jobs on an IBM mainframe or as a project with Micro Focus Mainframe Express (MFE) running on a PC with Windows (refer to http://www.microfocus.com). It is noted in the example if a technique is used that is unique to the mainframe and not supported by Mainframe Express.

The JCL examples may be downloaded. The examples are available as Z-Packs that provide individual programming examples, documentation and test data files in a single package. The Z-Packs are usually in zip format to reduce the amount of time to download.

The SQL Connection
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Many of the applications running on IBM Mainframes access information that is stored in a DB/2 Relational Data Base. This link is intended for individuals that are learning, creating or maintaining applications that access relational data bases. Unless otherwise stated the examples provided in  The SQL Connection  will run on an IBM Mainframe using MVS or a Personal Computer using Windows and Micro Focus Mainframe Express.

The SQL examples may be downloaded. The examples are available as Z-Packs that provide individual programming examples, documentation and test data files in a single package. The Z-Packs are usually in zip format to reduce the amount of time to download.

The VSAM and QSAM Connection
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Many of the applications running on IBM Mainframes access information that is stored in VSAM Data Sets or QSAM files. This link is intended for individuals that are learning, creating or maintaining applications that access VSAM data sets or QSAM files. Unless otherwise stated the examples provided in  The VSAM-QSAM Connection  will run on an IBM Mainframe using MVS or a Personal Computer using Windows and Micro Focus Mainframe Express.

The VSAM and QSAM examples may be downloaded. The examples are available as Z-Packs that provide individual programming examples, documentation and test data files in a single package. The Z-Packs are usually in zip format to reduce the amount of time to download.

Numeric Data Formats
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The following table provides links that describe some of the common numeric data formats used on an IBM Mainframe system. The descriptions also include the support for numeric formats on a Windows or UNIX system that is running Micro Focus COBOL.

Numeric Type Description
Zoned Decimal This document describes the zoned-decimal format. This is coded in COBOL as USAGE IS DISPLAY and is the default format if the USAGE clause is missing.
Packed Decimal This document describes the packed-decimal format. This is coded in COBOL as USAGE IS COMPUTATIONAL-3 and is usually coded in its abbreviated form of COMP-3.
Binary This document describes the binary format. This is coded in COBOL as USAGE IS COMPUTATIONAL and is usually coded in its abbreviated form of COMP. This may also be coded with the keyword BINARY.
Edited Numeric This document describes the edited numeric format. This is coded in COBOL using an edit mask in the picture clause. An example would be PIC ZZZ.99+.
number01 This example describes some commonly used techniques for managing various numeric formats available on the mainframe.
spsnum01 This is an introductory, self-study course about the commonly used numeric formats available on the mainframe. The course material may be purchased from SimoTime. The documentation may be viewed online.

Reference Section, Internet/Intranet
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This section identifies a variety of references materials for creating HTML pages and forms. It also contains references to building WEB sites.

Internet/Intranet for HTML
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The following book is an excellent learning and reference item for learning HTML and creating a WEB site.
 
Title - Author Publisher
HTML Goodies
Joe Burns, Ph.D.
ISBN: 0-7897-1823-5
QUE
Macmillan Publishing

201 West 103rd Street
Indianapolis, Indiana 46290
www.quecorp.com

Color Chart for HTML
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This item will provide a link to  a quick reference for defining colors  using hexadecimal values. A color chart showing the hexadecimal value and the color will be displayed.

Reference Section, Miscellaneous Items
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This section contains reference material that could not be included in another section.

ASCII or EBCDIC
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This item will provide a link to  an ASCII or EBCDIC translation table. A column for decimal, hexadecimal and binary is also included. When moving information (files or data buffers) between EBCDIC machines (mainframes are the most common EBCDIC machines) and ASCII machines it is quite often necessary to convert the information. If the data strings contain only display or printable characters then it is a straightforward, byte for byte conversion. However, in the real world the actual conversion of data strings between ASCII and EBCDIC is usually more complicated than a simple byte for byte conversion. For example, if the data strings contain packed or binary data or control information then the data conversion becomes content sensitive.

When downloading files from the mainframe to the PC many of the files are EBCDIC, 80-byte, fixed record length files containing control-oriented information. At SimoTime we use a utility program (SimoZAPS) to create ASCII files from the EBCDIC files. For data files that contain packed or binary data we use the TransCOPY feature of the File Convert function that creates a COBOL program that does the actual file copy and conversion. If we have special requirements we simply modify the COBOL program that will run on the mainframe or the PC (Mainframe Express or Net Express by Micro Focus run COBOL programs on the PC).

Reference Section, Issues and Possibilities
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This section describes a variety of issues and possible solutions. The primary discussions involve issues that may be encountered when extending the reach of mainframe applications to the Internet.

Identifying Members in a PDS
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The Issue - We are starting a major project that requires changes to a large application on the mainframe. All the source members (approximately 4,500) for the application are stored in the same PDS. This includes COBOL, Assembler, JCL, Procedures, Copy Files and some job control decks.
The Question - Is there a quick way to analyze the members in the PDS to determine the member types and produce a summary report?

Yes, there is a relatively quick way to identify what is stored in a PDS or other mainframe source code facilities. The programming analysis tools are available and would require downloading the source members to a PC.

SimoTime has the technology  (SimoLYZE)  and people to assist in this effort. We recently completed a project with 3,500 members in less than three days. Contact our  Help Desk  for more information.

What is member typing and why is it important? Member typing is the process of storing a source member and then being able to determine its content without having to examine the member.

This is typically accomplished in the following ways.

1. How the member is stored. Many of the source control management systems provide a capability of defining the type of member when it is being stored.
2. Where the member is stored. Member types are stored into specifics directories or libraries base on the type of member.
3. The name of the member. Naming conventions are used to identify a member type.

For example, on the PC the file extension is typically used for this purpose. Source member typing is often overlooked or receives a low priority in many programming shops. The importance of member typing is not often recognized until a change to an application is required. Attempting to estimate the skills required to implement a change and define the scope-of-effort required is very time consuming when the type and quantity of members that makeup an application are not known and/ or are difficult to determine. Some programming shops have attempted to keep track of members by type but even these shops run an average error rate of fifteen percent. Other shops or programming groups do not even attempt to track member types and many shops have a variety of application source code that has not been touched in years. Knowledge about these applications is minimal or non-existent.

Model a CICS Application as an Internet Application
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The Issue - We would like to take an existing CICS application and create HTML screens to show the business users how the application would look in an Internet environment.
The Question - Is there a way to quickly convert 25-30 BMS maps to HTML forms?

Yes, SimoTime has the technology ( SimoVIEW ) and people to assist in this effort. We recently completed a similar project with 45 BMS members in less than a week. Contact our  Help Desk  for more information.

Converting Mainframe Files to PC Files
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The Issue - We are starting a project that requires the downloading of VSAM, KSDS files and sequential files from the mainframe to the PC.
The Question - Is there a quick way to download the files and convert from EBCDIC to ASCII? Can this conversion be done on the mainframe prior to downloading or on the PC after downloading? What is a good tool for downloading files from the mainframe to the PC?

Yes, there is a relatively quick way to download VSAM, KSDS files and sequential files form the mainframe to the PC. The Mainframe Access technology that is included with Mainframe Express (refer to http://www.microfocus.com ) provides a simple GUI drag-and-drop capability for downloading VSAM and QSAM files.

SimoTime has the technology  (SimoZAPS)  and people to assist in this effort. The SimoZAPS technology has the ability to generate a file conversion program that is COBOL source code that may be compiled and executed on the PC or the mainframe. Contact our  Help Desk  for more information.

The COBOL, File Conversion, Volume 1, EBCDIC & ASCII, QSAM & VSAM is a suite of programs that will show how to convert the organization of a file between sequential and keyed indexed, change the file content between ASCII and EBCDIC or change the organization by position within a record. Simply click on one of the following items to   learn more  or   download  this sample set of programs.

The COBOL, File Conversion, Volume 2, Host to PC to Host is a suite of programs and documentation that will discuss the cycle of how to convert a VSAM, KSDS to a flat Sequential file on the mainframe, download the flat sequential file from the mainframe to the PC and create an Indexed file of ASCII content on the PC. Additional programs are included for converting ASCII, Text files to Indexed files. These examples also show how to manage Packed-Decimal and BINARY or COMP fields. Simply click on one of the following items to   learn more  or   download  this sample set of programs.

Internet Access
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This section provides access to various search engines and links to various other WEB sites. The links are provided solely as a convenience to you and not as an endorsement by SimoTime Enterprises of the content of such Web sites. SimoTime Enterprises is not responsible for the content of linked Web sites and does not make any representations regarding the content or accuracy of materials on such linked Web sites. If you decide to access linked Web sites, you do so at your own risk.

You may provide hyperlinks to this Web Site provided: (a) you notify us. You may send an e-mail to: webmaster@simotime.com to do this; (b) you do not remove or obscure, by framing or otherwise, advertisements, the copyright notice, or other notices on this Web Site; and (c) you discontinue providing hyperlinks to this Site if notified by SimoTime Enterprises.

Web Search Engines
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This section provides access to various search engines.

General Information and Vendor Sites
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This section provides additional links to sites with General Information or Specific Vendors.

Program Language, COBOL
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This section provides additional links to sites for the COBOL Programming Language.

Program Language, Mainframe Assembler
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This section provides additional links to sites for the Mainframe Assembler Programming Language.

Mainframe Oriented Sites
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This section provides additional links to sites for the Mainframe Oriented Sites.

Internet Oriented Sites
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This section provides additional links to sites for the Internet Oriented Sites.

File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
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This document provides a  summary of the File Transfer Protocol  (FTP) commands. It also includes an overview of the "how-to" do an interactive or automated, batch FTP session.

Technologies 
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Here at SimoTime, we have developed a variety of software technologies. These technologies can greatly increase the productivity of your workplace.

SimoTEK2 Series
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The SimoTEK2 Series is a group of technologies for individuals that have the responsibility for updating or modifying mainframe applications for deployment on mainframe or non-mainframe systems such as UNIX, Windows or the Internet.
Display  more information  or  order a free  thirty-day evaluation copy of the SimoTEK2 Series of technologies.

SimoLYZE
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Scan mainframe source code and determine the member type. The primary purpose of SimoLYZE is to do member typing and provide an overview of the number and type of members stored in a mainframe library or source code management facility. Prior to doing the initial scanning of the source code it must be downloaded from the mainframe to the PC.
Note: Member typing is the process of storing a source member and then being able to determine its content without having to examine the member.
Display  more information  or display  the technical details  or  order a free  thirty-day evaluation copy of SimoLYZE.

SimoVIEW
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Provide for the quick conversion of BMS screens to HTML forms.
Display  more information  or display  the technical details  or  order a free  thirty-day evaluation copy of SimoVIEW.

SimoX390
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Scan mainframe assembler source members. Identify macro and copy file dependencies.
Display  more information  or display  the technical details  or  order a free  thirty-day evaluation copy of SimoX390.

Also, take a look at the  Assembler Connection  section.

SimoZAPS
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Provide a HexView, HexFind, HexPatch, FileConvert, Translate, Modify and FormatCOBOL capability for ASCII and EBCDIC files.

Function Description
Hexcess The hexadecimal access function (HEXCESS) provides a view (or hexadecimal dump) of a file in hexadecimal format. When possible the EBCDIC and ASCII characters are displayed. The hexadecimal dump information is displayed and written to a SYSLOG file. The starting and stopping positions may be specified.
Hexcess/2 provides a "FIND" capability. A search argument may be specified and the input file is read until a data match is found. Once a data match is found the 128 byte section of the file containing the match is displayed and written to the SYSLOG file.
Hexcess/2 provides a "PATCH' capability. A data string of a maximum of thirty-two (32) bytes may be specified on the command line. This data string will be written at the position specified within the file.
FileConvert This GENERATE function provides for translation between ASCII/Text and EBCDIC files. The file content (ASCII or EBCDIC), record format (variable and fixed), the record lengths and the file type (SEQUENTIAL, INDEXED or ASCII/CRLF may be converted at the record level or by positions within the record..
FileCompare This function will generate the COBOL source code for a data file comparison program. This generated program may be compiled and executed on a mainframe or any platform that supports Micro Focus COBOL. The compiled program will read two files (SYSUT1) and (SYSUT2) and compare positions in each record. The positions to compare may be specified at compile time or execution time.
Translate The TRANSLATE function provides for simple translation between ASCII/Text and EBCDIC/80-byte files. Both the content (ASCII or EBCDIC) and file format (variable-text and fixed-80-byte) are converted.
Modify The MODIFY function provides the capability of copying an ASCII/Text file. The content of the output file may be modified in the process. Individual records may be included or deleted based on their content. Also, individual records that are being copied may be modified using such keywords as insert, append, replace and more.
FormatCOBOL The FormatCOBOL function simply provides a consistent use of upper and lower case for COBOL source code. Many times we work with COBOL code that has evolved over a number of years and the use of upper and lower case varies widely. With the consistent use of upper/lower case it makes the code easier to read and understand .

Display  more information  or display  the technical details  or  order a free  thirty-day evaluation copy of SimoZAPS.

SimoWEB1
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A copy of the SimoTime Web Site is available on CD. A connection to the Internet may not always be available and our web site has increased in size with valuable reference material and examples of mainframe programming techniques. Now you can obtain a copy of the SimoTime Web Site and have the speed, availability and convenience of a local machine or LAN. It is easy to order a copy today.

Download ZIP'ped Packages
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This link provides access to a variety of programming examples for COBOL, mainframe Assembler, JCL , Java and more. The examples are provided as Z-Packs (or zipped files) that may be downloaded. The Z-Packs provide individual programming examples, documentation and test data files in a single package. The list may be  displayed in a new window  concurrently with this page.

Permission to use, copy, modify and distribute this software for any non-commercial purpose and without fee is hereby granted, provided the SimoTime copyright notice appear on all copies of the software. The SimoTime name or Logo may not be used in any advertising or publicity pertaining to the use of the software.

SimoTime Enterprises makes no warranty or representations about the suitability of the software for any purpose. It is provided "AS IS" without any express or implied warranty, including the implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose and non-infringement. SimoTime Enterprises shall not be liable for any direct, indirect, special or consequential damages resulting from the loss of use, data or projects, whether in an action of contract or tort, arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of this software.

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